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Fauna

--Mangrove|Mudflat|Freshwater|Back Mangrove
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Fauna of the mangroves

img A resident bird of Singapore, the White-collared Kingfisher can often be found flying amidst the mangrove trees. Watch this bird dive for fish from its favourite perch on mangrove branches along Sungei Buloh Besar.
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img During high tide, these crabs climb out of the water to escape predation. They form an important component of the ecosystem by feeding on fallen mangrove leaves that do not decompose easily. This helps in the breakdown of the mangrove leaves into nutrients for the mangrove plants.
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img The spiders in the reserve are colourful and easily spotted on their intricately patterned webs.
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img Growing up to 2 metres, the Monitor Lizard is the largest lizard found in Singapore. This creature can often be seen sun-bathing on the walking routes! Fear not, as when disturbed, it will clumsily escape into the undergrowth or water. It is an excellent swimmer, living near water where it scavenges.
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img The Mudskipper is an amazing fish of the swamp. Unlike most fishes, its protruding eyes stick out of the water and enable it to observe itís surrounding. It has modified fins that help propel it out of water and across the mudflats.
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img The Mud Lobster makes this mini volcano-like mound of mud. They are very important member of the mangrove ecosystem. It excavates below the surface of the mud, pushing mud to the surface and making its home higher as it digs. In this way it helps to bring nutrients from deep underground to the surface, helping in the recycling of nutrients in the ecosystem.
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img Barnacles are actually crustaceans, which include members such as prawns and crabs. Once they find a suitable site, they attach themselves head-first to the support by secreting a strong protein cement, forming strong calcareous plates around themselves. They feed during high tide using their legs like a filtering device, sieving plankton from the water during hide tide to their mouth. When the tide recede they retreat to the safety of their shells, closing the valves to protect themselves from drying out.
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img The Common Nerita is a commonly seen throughout the mangroves in the reserve. It is herbivorous, grazing on algae. During high tide it can be seen on tree trunks and various structures.
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img This rather flat looking bivalve is called the Leaf Oyster. They usually attached to the roots of the mangrove trees.


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